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Trainer

A handwashing behaviour change system for schools and communities that don’t have access to taps, plumbing or a hygiene service.


1.5 litres of water upto 60 handwashes with soap minimal water


19 litres of water over 1000 Handwashes with soap in freeflow


A handwashing behaviour change system for Schools and communities, through a ‘Train the Trainer’ system.


OBJECTIVE --

The whole school or community should be capable of installing and using a SPATAP. The key will be the Headteacher or community leader’s commitment, and they will need to understand the operation and installation. These skills and objectives learned will be passed on the school body of staff and students.


Train The Trainer ➡️ https://youtu.be/IZ2vkT8Eg8s

Handwash Behaviour change ➡️ https://youtu.be/rkfOVkESBrY

HHFH Website ➡️ https://handhygieneforhealth.org/


EXAMPLE:

TRAINER TRAINS THE HEADTEACHER and appointed ASSISTANT. THIS ASSISTANT TRAINS THE TEACHERS.

TEACHERS TRAIN THE STUDENT BODY.


SCHOOLS:

The method starts by training the Headteacher, which is then passed onto the teaching staff, and then to the student body. This becomes a classroom task and is perpetual.

START: 

This is a 3 stage process.

First: The ‘why’ 

Second: The ‘need.’ 

Third: The implementation.

  • A training session via the booklet with the implementing personnel, if no Train the Trainer is available.
  • The assembly of the portable tap will be given in the brochure. 
  • This includes the SpaTap insertion, water dispensing, soap storage and the correct method of handwashing.
  • Next is the introduction of Classroom roster charts. These create the routine behaviour change and the long-term success of the Program. Each class will have a roster, made by the teacher)
  • The Headteacher introduces the system method to the appointed overseeing teacher now known as the “HHFH coordinator”, via the brochure. 
  • This project will be incorporated into the school timetable. The ‘train the trainer’ of the coordinators will be formal, at a time suitable to the school; however, this should be carried out soonest, when the Taps are in situ. 
  •  Teaching staff appoint two students every day and will be listed on the roster. Their duty will be to fill bottles of water and maintain their classroom tap. No other students are allowed to play with or install the SPATAP on this day. 
  • All students will be rotated for this duty as a privileged job. (Students feel it’s the best job in the school and enjoy it!)
  • Students are ultimately responsible for the installation and maintenance of their class SPATAP thus, they feel empowered.
  • Teachers oversee and upskill students where required.
  • After the full use of class rotation, all students will be actively taking part in handwashing behaviour

The outcome is, a lifetime habit, of clean hands by washing with soap and water.

  • This knowledge learnt in an educational environment will reduce the spread of disease.  
  • Students will ‘teach’ and introduce the SpaTap system to the community, and possibly to each household, aid post, marketplace.

MODULE 1:

The appointed Trainer will demonstrate to designated personnel, the parts of the SPATAP as follows;

  • Describe the main parts of SPATAP: 
  • THE BUNG, 
  • AIR INLET PUMP OUTlET, 
  • TAP & SHOWER OUTLET)
  • BOTTLE INSERT INNER FLANGE
  • F1 SMALL BOTTLE LIP
  • F2 MEDIUM BOTTLE LIP
  • F3 BIG BOTTLE LIP.
  • Pass to students, so everyone gets to handle the SPATAP and bottle set-up.
  • Get the class to repeat 3 times the parts of SPATAPS
  • Demonstrate how to attach a bottle by inverting the upright bottle and SPATAP to the HANGING position. Have filled bottles ready to go during the progression of the workshop.

MODULE 2:

Installation Method;

  1. HANG IN SPATAP IN PLACE CONVENIENT FOR CLASS HANDWASHING
  2. MAKE SURE BUNG IS INSERTED CORRECTLY
  3. INVERT THE SPATAP, SO OPENING FACES DOWN
  4. INSERT FULL BOTTLE OF WATER UPWARDS
  5. FIRMLY BOTTLE INTO SPATAP
  6. FLIP THE BOTTLE
  7. SECURE IN PLACE BY ADJUSTING CORD LOCK TOGGLE
  8. INSERT A BAR OF SOAP, AND IS SECURED IN PLACE
  9.  INSTALLATION COMPLETED

Demonstrate the dispersion methods of the SPATAP.

  1. SQUEEZE WITH BUNG ‘IN’ FOR MINIMAL WATER USAGE
  2. REMOVE BUNG FOR FREE FLOW OF WATER AND ‘NO TOUCH’ HANDWASHING 
  3. TOUCH HANDS-ON SOAP BAR 
  4. WASH HANDS WITH SOAP  
  5. RINSE WITH RUNNING WATER



MODULE 3:

      CLASSROOM DEMONSTRATION:

  • A place to hang a SPATAP & BOTTLE
  • Water filled bottle (Suggest 1.5litre)
  • SPATAPS to pass around the class
  • A selection of different size bottles made of different materials
  • A roster system grid for the teachers to fill in.


MODULE 4:

TRAIN THE TRAINER PROCEDURE: 

The Trainer requests a volunteer student and demonstrates how to attach the bottle. 

Explains that SPATAPS are to remain in situ, not to be interfered with or moved, unless permission from the teacher is given.

Demonstrate 3 ways of dispensing water. 

1) Minimal water mode = (‘Milking the cow’) 

2) Free Flow = (‘Free Flow’) 

3) Pump MODE = (‘Big Wash’)

  • Request students to demonstrate the 3 ways of dispensing water.
  • Student No.1 could ask for a volunteer and Student No.1 to train student No.2. by demonstrating to student No.2 how to operate the SPATAP and check they are doing it correctly 
  • This is the start of the “Train the Trainer” and “handwashing champion role” as marked on the ROSTER sheet.
  • REPEAT this step. Get student No.2 to ask for a volunteer.
  • Form a Queue and repeat the operation until everyone has participated and understands the SPATAP 3 ways of dispensing water.


WHEN BOTTLE IS EMPTY, THE NEXT STUDENT IS TO FiLL THE BOTTLE USING METHOD as above.

  • Refill bottles in situ using the SPATAP bottle refill method, as demonstrated at the beginning of the workshop.

BREAK- Review session


MODULE 5:

-- WATER EFFICIENCY DEMONSTRATION

  • DEMONSTRATION OF WATER EFFICIENCY EXERCISE
  • Ask at least 2 or 3 classes of students (100 students?) to form a queue behind one SPATAP with 1.5litre of water
  • Using only the “Milking The Cow” mode
  • Ask teachers and Volunteer Students to keep a running count
  • Ask students to see how many handwashes with soap can be achieved with 1.5litres of water, washing their hands for 20 seconds each. (Maybe singing a 20-second song?)
  • This process demonstrates water efficiency
  • REPEAT USING “FREE FLOW MODE”
  • Ask teachers and Volunteer Students to keep a running count
  • Ask students to see how many handwashes with soap can be achieved with 1.5litres of water
  • This process demonstrates water efficiency

THE END OF THIS EXERCISE THE STUDENT WILL HAVE HYGIENICALLY CLEAN HANDS

Creating a ‘French’ drainage system assists with water dispensation at the site of the installed SPATAP, and is a pit filled with stones.

To do so, follow these suggestions:

  1. Split up into classes find a suitable place to hang the SPATAP near to the Classroom.
  2. Secure the SPATAP INTO POSITION
  3. Choose a Place in the shade, not FULL SUNLIGHT
  4. Plantings under the SPATAP could be considered, as they will be watered by the greywater
  5. INVESTIGATE DRAINAGE OPTIONS, such as a French Drain of pebbles, stones and rocks in a pit. (Smallest to largest on top).
  6. CHOOSE A SUITABLE SIZE BOTTLE TO HANG AS NEAR AS POSSIBLE TO THE TOILETS (15 to 20 Litres BIG BLUE BOTTLE RECOMMENDED)

MODULE 6:

 CREATING THE HAND WASH HABIT

  • Teacher to make roster duties visible to the whole class.4
  • Bottle filling /Handwashing champion
  • SPATAP cleaning every day by washing with soap and water.
  • The handwashing behaviour change is created by the IMPLEMENTATION OF THE ROSTER. 

  1. The teacher uses a simple roster system to assign duties for SPATAP management
  2. IMPORTANT: Teacher to inform the class of handwash times, e.g. before Class, Morning break, lunchtime after toilet.
  3. 2 students per day to refill bottles and install Classroom SPATAP
  4. One student to act as handwash Champion to monitor, water usage, behaviour, handwash cleanliness.
  5. Immediate and instant adherence to classroom WASH Policy.
  6. Upon successful completion of the course, students receive a certificate award for the cleanest hands and best kept and maintained SPATAPS. This is taken home and starts the interaction from child to adult.

THE REPETITION OF THIS SYSTEM WILL CREATE THE HANDWASHING HABIT


SPATAP is made of silicone, (not plastic) is UV stable -- and is graded safe for food and water. However, do not leave it in direct sunlight as plastic bottles will expand and contract in the heat, and this causes leakage. Hang the SPATAP in the shade.

SPATAP can be cleaned easily, just like a cup or plate, put it in the washing up or wash it when you are using it.

You can turn SPATAP inside out to clean it thoroughly ready for its next usage.

Rotary Project Hand Hygiene For Health (HHFH) uses the SPATAP to transform most bottles or containers into flow-controllable handwashing taps, with a ‘built-in’ convenient soap caddy, to schools with the lack of no plumbing infrastructure. This device can be installed in a few seconds, anywhere, by anyone, including children as young as 5 years old. SPATAP provides an immediate, easy to operate handwashing station and is used by schools, communities and medical posts that have limited, basic or nonexistent hygiene services.

SPATAP use is an incredible water-saver and can dispense up to 60 Handwashes from just 1.5L of water. 

-- Use either 1 Touch Handwashing with minimal water used

Or 

-- No-touch handwashing

(Teacher Removes the bung and then replaces at the end of the Handwash practice)

Below are instructions for correct usage, please read carefully. 

Just like any gadget, SPATAP has its own tips and tricks. We hope you realize the full potential of this multi-award-winning device, as it will serve handwashing and affiliated needs for many years.

As a rule use️

Use a hard bottle for a tap (This is flow controllable with bung and squeeze modes)

Use a soft bottle for a power shower, the soft bottle will implode and force the water out under a higher water pressure (the thinner the container, the higher the water flow pressure)

Different bottles are made from different materials and will produce different results from the SPATAP (Instruct children to collect different bottles to see what works best and why?)

Select a bottle suitable for your purpose.

This will depend on your requirements for washing or water usage and intended flow use.

The selection of the correct bottle or container is essential for the best results.

Experiment and try many different bottles, containers, cans, jam jars, shampoo bottles, military canteens, soft plastic bottles of varying sizes, e.g. 600ml, 1L, 1.5L, 15L etc

The SPATAP can stretch and has been fitted onto 42mm bottle lips.

Airtight Tip when using in Tap mode

Aim for an airtight seal, remove any bottle rings, and make sure the SPATAP inner flange is not crossing a bottle thread. This is important as any air gaps will produce a leak or slow drip when used in the tap mode. Aim for an airtight fit on all bottles. Still, if using a power shower bottle, then any leakage is not as significant as the whole bottle will empty throughout the shower.

For example:

-- Harder plastic, metal or glass are good bottles (containers) to use for the ‘tap’ mode. In contrast, softer plastics are suitable for the eco shower, and some are good for both.

-- Soft plastic bottles will implode and force the water out faster and quicker. These are suitable when water is abundant and where a power shower is required. It is best to use 2litre soft drinks bottles for this effect.

-- Hard plastic Military canteens, 1-litre soft drink bottles and metal bottles are useful for hand washing, and water is scarce

-- A 15-litre blue bottle is perfect for washing the hands of 300 children at a rural school

Select the correct container for your situation.

SPATAP is UV stable, but plastic drink bottles are not. If left in direct sun for over an hour, they tend to expand and contract and can cause leakage, so to avoid this, hang your SPATAP and bottle in the shade.

SPATAP is used recreationally and in the developing world where plumbing infrastructure and access to fresh water is challenging to obtain. 

ROTARY Project to ‘Hand Hygiene For Health’ aims to ELEVATE Hygiene Poverty worldwide.

SOAP CADDY  DEMONSTRATION:

SPATAPS CAN BE COLOUR CODED FOR USE

E.g Blue for boys outside the Classroom, Orange outside toilets, Clear for medical, Pink for girls outside the Classroom.


SOLAR WATER DISINFECTION USING THE SODIS TECHNIQUE

HHFH & SPATAP promote the trusted technique of solar disinfection of water when fresh water supplies are not available. For more info https://www.sodis.ch/methode/index_EN.html

Water can be disinfected and in this way made drinkable using the rays of the sun. “Solar water disinfection” -- SODIS for short -- thus offers a solution for preventing diarrhoea, one of the most common causes of death among people in developing countries.

Clean drinking water in 6 hours

The SODIS method is ideal for treating water for drinking in developing countries. All it requires is sunlight and PET bottles. How does it work? Clear PET bottles are filled with the water and set out in the sun for 6 hours. The UV-A rays in sunlight kill germs such as viruses, bacteria and parasites (giardia and cryptosporidia). The method also works when air and water temperatures are low.

People can use the SODIS method to treat their drinking water themselves. The method is very simple and its application is safe. It is particularly suitable for treating relatively small quantities of drinking water.

Research

Many scientific studies confirmed the effectiveness of the SODIS method. It kills germs in water very efficiently. The method has even been shown to improve the health of the population. Research into training strategies gave insight about which communication methods are most suitable. It has also been proven that the use of PET bottles in the SODIS method is harmless.

International recognition

The World Health Organisation (WHO), UNICEF, and the Red Cross therefore recommend the SODIS method as a way to treat drinking water in developing countries.

“Solar disinfection is an example of another measure with proven health impact that requires little capital investment on the part of end-users, and is thus appropriate for the very poor.” WHO, 2007

“UNICEF promotes a variety of treatment methods such as user-friendly filtration, simple solar water disinfection (SODIS) and home chlorination. These are all low-cost, effective and manageable at the household level.” UNICEF, 2009

Red Cross Prize, 2006: “The jury considers SODIS an impressive way of contributing by the simplest means to making water supplies better and safer, thereby reducing diarrhoea and other diseases like it, and mortality in developing countries.” Red Cross, 2006